The Royal Art of Poison: Filthy Palaces, Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicine, and Murder Most Foul

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St. Martin's Press #ad - Gazing at gorgeous portraits of centuries past, we don’t see what lies beneath the royal robes and the stench of unwashed bodies; the lice feasting on private parts; and worms nesting in the intestines. Women wore makeup made with mercury and lead. The most gorgeous palaces were little better than filthy latrines.

Men rubbed turds on their bald spots. To avoid poison, unicorn horns, they depended on tasters, and antidotes tested on condemned prisoners. Servants licked the royal family’s spoons, tried on their underpants and tested their chamber pots. Ironically, medications, royals terrified of poison were unknowingly poisoning themselves daily with their cosmetics, and filthy living conditions.

The Royal Art of Poison: Filthy Palaces, Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicine, and Murder Most Foul #ad - Physicians prescribed mercury enemas, drinks of lead filings, arsenic skin cream, and potions of human fat and skull, fresh from the executioner. Finn says, “i want to read the Royal Art of Poison, Eleanor Herman’s history of poisons. Hugely entertaining, a work of pop history that traces the use of poison as a political—and cosmetic—tool in the royal courts of Western Europe from the Middle Ages to the Kremlin todayThe story of poison is the story of power.

One of washington independent review of books' 50 Favorite Books of 2018 • A Buzzfeed Best Book of 2018"Morbidly witty. Marilyn stasio, the new york Times "You’ll be as appalled at times as you are entertained. Bustle, one of the 17 best nonfiction Books Coming Out In June 2018"A heady mix of erudite history and delicious gossip.

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Roanoke: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Colony

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Arcade #ad - But there will be no rescue. Before help can reach them, all will vanish with barely a trace. The lost colony is America’s oldest unsolved mystery. Narrating a thrilling tale of court intrigue, spy rings, treachery, sabotage, Native American politics, and colonial power, Miller has finally shed light on a four-hundred-year-old unsolved mystery.

She establishes beyond doubt that the tragedy of the Lost Colony did not begin on the shores of Roanoke but within the walls of Westminster, in the inner circle of Queen Elizabeth’s government. On roanoke island, off the coast of North Carolina, a tragedy is unfolding. As miller detects, powerful men had reason to want Raleigh’s mission to fail.

Roanoke: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Colony #ad - Something has gone very wrong, women, among them the first English child born in the New World, and children, and the colony—115 men, Virginia Dare—is in trouble. November 1587. Furthermore, miller shows what must have become of the settlers, left to face a hostile world that was itself suffering the upheavals of an alien invasion.

In this remarkable example of historical detective work, Lee Miller goes back to the original evidence and offers a fresh solution to the enduring legend. A report reaches london that sir walter Raleigh’s expedition, which left England months before to land the first English settlers in America, has foundered.

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The Borgias and Their Enemies, 1431-1519: 1431-1519

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Mariner Books #ad - Two of his seven papal offspring also rose to power and fame—Lucrezia Borgia, and that brother, his daughter, Cesare, whose husband was famously murdered by her brother, who inspired Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince. From the author of the rise and fall of the house of Medici and other acclaimed works, The Borgias and Their Enemies is “a fascinating read” Library Journal.

This colorful history of a powerful family brings the world they lived in—the glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissance—to life. Notorious for seizing power, land, wealth, and titles through bribery, and murder, marriage, the dynasty’s dramatic rise from its Spanish roots to its occupation of the highest position in Renaissance society forms a gripping tale.

The Borgias and Their Enemies, 1431-1519: 1431-1519 #ad - The name borgia is synonymous with the corruption, nepotism, and greed that were rife in Renaissance Italy.    . The powerful, voracious rodrigo Borgia, better known to history as Pope Alexander VI, was the central figure of the dynasty.

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The Knife Man: Blood, Body Snatching, and the Birth of Modern Surgery

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Broadway Books #ad - The vivid, often gruesome portrait of the 18th-century pioneering surgeon and father of modern medicine, John Hunter. When robert louis Stevenson wrote his gothic horror story of Dr. Using the knowledge he gained from countless human dissections, Hunter worked to improve medical care for both the poorest and the best-known figures of the era—including Sir Joshua Reynolds and the young Lord Byron.

An insatiable student of all life-forms, Hunter was also an expert naturalist. Jekyll and Mr. He kept exotic creatures in his country menagerie and dissected the first animals brought back by Captain Cook from Australia. This is a fascinating portrait of a remarkable pioneer and his determined struggle to haul surgery out of the realms of meaningless superstitious ritual and into the dawn of modern medicine.

The Knife Man: Blood, Body Snatching, and the Birth of Modern Surgery #ad - In an age when operations were crude, extremely painful, and often fatal, he rejected medieval traditions to forge a revolution in surgery founded on pioneering scientific experiments. Ultimately his research led him to expound highly controversial views on the age of the earth, as well as equally heretical beliefs on the origins of life more than sixty years before Darwin published his famous theory.

Although a central figure of the Enlightenment, Hunter’s tireless quest for human corpses immersed him deep in the sinister world of body snatching. The choice was understandable, for Hunter was both widely acclaimed and greatly feared. From humble origins, John Hunter rose to become the most famous anatomist and surgeon of the eighteenth century.

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An Underground Education: The Unauthorized and Outrageous Supplement to Everything You Thought You Knew About Art, Sex, Business, Crime, Science, Medicine, and Other Fields

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Anchor #ad - Harding, which was excerpted in classy magazines like Harper's and earned the attention of the even classier New York Times, which noted that "Zacks specializes in the raunchy and perverse. The georgia state Legislature voted on whether to ban the book from public libraries. He has studied arabic, french, latin, greek, Italian, and Hebrew, and received the Phillips Classical Greek Award at the University of Michigan.

He has also told his publisher that he made a living in Cairo cheating royalty from a certain Arab country at games of chance, although the claim remains unverified. His writing has appeared in the new york times, tV Guide, The Village Voice, Time, The Atlantic Monthly, Sports Illustrated, Life, and similarly diverse publications.

Zacks is married and busy warping the minds of his two children, Georgia and Ziegfield. He resides in New York City. From the Hardcover edition. The best kind of knowledge is uncommon knowledge. Okay, so maybe you know all the stuff you're supposed to know--that there are teenier things than atoms, that Remembrance of Things Past has something to do with a perfumed cookie, that the Monroe Doctrine means we get to take over small South American countries when we feel like it.

An Underground Education: The Unauthorized and Outrageous Supplement to Everything You Thought You Knew About Art, Sex, Business, Crime, Science, Medicine, and Other Fields #ad - But really, or the loser spending forty-five minutes examining the host's bookshelves?wouldn't you rather learn things like how the invention of the bicycle affected the evolution of underwear?  Or that the 1949 Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to a doctor who performed lobotomies with a household ice pick?  Or how Catherine the Great really died?  Or that heroin was sold over the counter not too long ago?For the truly well-rounded "intellectual, " nothing fascinates so much as the subversive, the suppressed, the contrarian, is this kind of knowledge going to make you the hit of the cocktail party, and the bizarre.

Richard zacks, ferreting out endlessly fascinating facts, auto-didact extraordinaire, gasp in wonder, stories, and images guaranteed to make you laugh, has unloosed his admittedly strange mind and astonishing research abilities upon the entire spectrum of human knowledge, photos, and occasionally shudder at the depths of human depravity.

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Lesser Beasts: A Snout-to-Tail History of the Humble Pig

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Basic Books #ad - Incredibly efficient at converting almost any organic matter into nourishing, delectable protein, and the animals themselves are maligned as filthy, swine are nothing short of a gastronomic godsend—yet their flesh is banned in many cultures, lazy brutes. As historian mark essig reveals in lesser beasts, swine have such a bad reputation for precisely the same reasons they are so valuable as a source of food: they are intelligent, self-sufficient, and omnivorous.

Yet pigs’ ability to track down and eat a wide range of substances some of them distinctly unpalatable to humans and convert them into edible meat has also led people throughout history to demonize the entire species as craven and unclean. Today’s unconscionable system of factory farming, Essig explains, is only the latest instance of humans taking pigs for granted, and the most recent evidence of how both pigs and people suffer when our symbiotic relationship falls out of balance.

An expansive, illuminating history of one of our most vital yet unsung food animals, Lesser Beasts turns a spotlight on the humble creature that, perhaps more than any other, has been a mainstay of civilization since its very beginnings—whether we like it or not. Unlike other barnyard animals, which pull plows, or grow wool, give eggs or milk, a pig produces only one thing: meat.

Lesser Beasts: A Snout-to-Tail History of the Humble Pig #ad - Tracing the interplay of pig biology and human culture from Neolithic villages 10, 000 years ago to modern industrial farms, Essig blends culinary and natural history to demonstrate the vast importance of the pig and the tragedy of its modern treatment at the hands of humans. Pork, has long been a staple of the human diet, Essig explains, prized in societies from Ancient Rome to dynastic China to the contemporary American South.

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Pirates of New England: Ruthless Raiders and Rotten Renegades

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Globe Pequot Press #ad - Tales of swashbuckling adventure, treachery, murder, and mayhem! One would be mistaken to think of pirates as roaming only the Caribbean. Pirates as famous as william kidd and henry every have at various times plundered, and murdered their way up and down the New England seaboard, pillaged, striking fear among local merchants and incurring the wrath of colonial authorities.

Included in this volume are:ned Low’s sadistic—at times cannibalistic—reign of terror on the high seas and his mysterious disappearance. John quelch’s defiant and unapologetic proclamations before being hanged in front of Boston’s crowds. Henry every’s daring attack on the Grand Mogul’s fleet, widely considered the largest maritime heist in history.

Pirates of New England: Ruthless Raiders and Rotten Renegades #ad - Pirates of new england opens up new chapters in the history of piracy, ones that you’ll come back to again and again—Welcome aboard! Piracy historian gail selinger brings these tales of mayhem and villainy to life while also exploring why New England became such a breeding ground for high seas crime and how the view of piracy changed over time, from winking toleration to brutal crackdown.

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Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Life Ballantine Reader's Circle

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Ballantine Books #ad - In this beautifully written biography, Alison Weir paints a vibrant portrait of a truly exceptional woman and provides new insights into her intimate world. Renowned in her time for being the most beautiful woman in Europe, the wife of two kings and mother of three, Eleanor of Aquitaine was one of the great heroines of the Middle Ages.

Eleanor of aquitaine lived a long life of many contrasts, of splendor and desolation, and in this stunning narrative, power and peril, Weir captures the woman—and the queen—in all her glory. At a time when women were regarded as little more than chattel, Eleanor managed to defy convention as she exercised power in the political sphere and crucial influence over her husbands and sons.

Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Life Ballantine Reader's Circle #ad - . With astonishing historic detail, and irresistible accounts of royal scandal and intrigue, mesmerizing pageantry, she recreates not only a remarkable personality but a magnificent past era.

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Medieval Sieges & Siegecraft

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Skyhorse #ad - His stimulating and accessible study will be fascinating reading for medieval specialists and for anyone who is interested in the history of warfare. He shows siege tactics in action through real-life case studies of famous sieges that changed the course of history in medieval Europe and the Holy Land. Here geoffrey hindley serves us the history of military sieges from every angle, exploring the psychology of laying siege, penning vivid portraits of the weapons involved, tracing the development of fortifications and equipment offensive and defensive, and even describing the role played by women and camp followers in battle.

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Seven Ages of Paris

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Vintage #ad - In this luminous portrait of paris, the celebrated historian gives us the history, culture, disasters, and triumphs of one of the world’s truly great cities. With a keen eye for the telling anecdote and pivotal moment, he portrays an array of vivid incidents to show us how Paris endures through each age, is altered but always emerges more brilliant and beautiful than ever.

An ambitious and skillful narrative that covers the history of Paris with considerable brio and fervor. Los angeles times book review. From the rise of philippe auguste through the reigns of henry iv and louis xiv who abandoned paris for versailles; napoleon’s rise and fall; Baron Haussmann’s rebuilding of Paris at the cost of much of the medieval city; the Belle Epoque and the Great War that brought it to an end; the Nazi Occupation, the Liberation, and the postwar period dominated by de Gaulle--Horne brings the city’s highs and lows, savagery and sophistication, and heroes and villains splendidly to life.

Seven Ages of Paris #ad - The seven ages of paris is a great historian’s tribute to a city he loves and has spent a lifetime learning to know. Knowledgeable and colorful, written with gusto and love. While paris may be many things, it is never boring.

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The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn

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Ballantine Books #ad - Charged with high treason and imprisoned in the Tower of London in May 1536, Anne met her terrible end all the while protesting her innocence. Weir unravels the tragic tale of anne's fall, from her miscarriage of the son who would have saved her to the horrors of her incarceration and that final, dramatic scene on the scaffold.

. There remains, much mystery surrounding the queen's arrest and the events leading up to it: were charges against her fabricated because she stood in the way of Henry VIII making a third marriage and siring an heir, however, or was she the victim of a more complex plot fueled by court politics and deadly rivalry?    The Lady in the Tower examines in engrossing detail the motives and intrigues of those who helped to seal the queen's fate.

Anne's ascent from private gentlewoman to queen was astonishing, but equally compelling was her shockingly swift downfall. Nearly five hundred years after her violent death, controversial, second wife to Henry VIII, remains one of the world's most fascinating, Anne Boleyn, and tragic heroines. Only in alison weir's capable hands can readers learn the truth about the fate of one of the most influential and important women in English history.

The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn #ad - Bonus: this edition contains a the Lady in the Tower discussion guide and an excerpt from Alison Weir's Mary Boleyn. Now acclaimed historian and bestselling author alison Weir has drawn on myriad sources from the Tudor era to give us the first book that examines, in unprecedented depth, dark, the gripping, and chilling story of Anne Boleyn's final days.

The tempestuous love affair between Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn scandalized Christendom and altered forever the religious landscape of England. What emerges is an extraordinary portrayal of a woman of great courage whose enemies were bent on utterly destroying her, and who was tested to the extreme by the terrible plight in which she found herself.

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